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Tag: consent

“We take your privacy very seriously”

….says the intrusive ‘cookie consent’ popup which requires me to navigate through various pages, puzzle out the jargonerics and fiddle with settings before I can access the content I actually want to read on the site.

Here’s the thing. If your website is infested with trackers, if you are passing my data on to third parties for profiling and analytics, if your privacy info gets a full Bad Privacy Notice Bingo scorecard, then you DON’T take my privacy seriously at all. You have deliberately chosen to place your commercial interests and convenience over my fundamental rights and freedoms, then place the cognitive and temporal burden on me to protect myself. That’s the opposite of taking privacy very seriously, and the fact that you’re willing to lie about that/don’t understand that is a Big Red Flag for someone like me.

Meme Frenzy

At some point, I’m going to try and make a privacy notice delivered through the medium of internet memes. While playing about with the possibilities of this, I got totally sidetracked and ended up data-protection-ifying a load of popular memes for my own nerdy amusement.

Here are the fruits of my misdirected labour. I think I might need to get out more

Tea, sex and data

Comparing consent for processing personal data with consent for sexual activity.

Many laws, professional obligations, contracts and standards make reference to “consent” as a basis or requirement for something to be done. As I’ve mentioned before in an earlier post, “consent” is not a tick box or a signature, it is a state of relationship between two (or more) parties.

With this in mind, I’m going to write about something we’re almost all enthusiastic about (sexual activity) and something I’m [also] very enthusiastic about (data protection) in the hope that comparing the two will lead to greater understanding of how to manage consent as a legal basis for processing personal data, while keeping your attention for long enough to explain…

Consent or not consent?

Update: I’ve exported the tool as a PDF so you can see the questions and answers. It’s no longer interactive, but it may still be helpful.

Consent decision tree


Update: Sorry that the tool is not currently working – My supposedly ‘unlimited’ free Zingtree account has expired, and they want £984 a year for me to renew it, which I can’t afford. Currently looking for alternatives – if you know of one, hit me up! I’ll post a downloadable text version of the tool very soon.


Following on from some of the ranting I’ve been doing about the current unhealthy obsession with consent for processing, here’s a funky tool that I have created for determining whether consent is the appropriate legal basis for processing under GDPR.

At the moment, it only covers Article 6 but I’m working on another one that addresses special categories of personal data as well.

Please let me know what you think about this tool in the comments section!

What the GDPR does – and doesn’t – say about consent

Meme courtesy of Jenny Lynn (@JennyL_RM)

You may have noticed that the General Data Protection Regulation is rather in the news lately, and quite right too considering there is only a year left to prepare for the most stringent and wide-reaching privacy law the EU has yet seen. Unfortunately however, in the rush to jump onto the latest marketing bandwagon, a lot of misleading and inaccurate information posing as “advice” in order to promote products and services is flourishing and appears to be drowning out more measured and expert commentary. Having seen a worrying number of articles, advertisements, blog posts and comments all giving the same wrong message about GDPR’s “consent” requirements, I was compelled to provide a layperson’s explanation of what GDPR really says on the subject.

So, let me start by saying GDPR DOES NOT MAKE CONSENT A MANDATORY REQUIREMENT FOR ALL PROCESSING OF PERSONAL DATA.

Hello. I use privacy-friendly analytics (Matomo) to track visits to my website. Can I please set a cookie to enable this tracking? I’m afraid that various plugins and content I have on the site here also use cookies, so a ‘yes’ to cookies is a ‘yes’ to those too. Please have a look at my Privacy Info page for more info about these, and visit my advice page for tips on protecting your privacy online